German Wines

German Wines

Germany has a history of winemaking that dates back to 100 B.C. when ancient Romans, who conquered the region, began producing wines on local soil. On the steep slate and shale banks along the Mosel, the pristine, castle-crowned vineyards of the Rheingau and the rolling hills of Rheinhessen, Germany produces some of the world's most exhilarating white wines.

Worldwide, there are about 34.000 hectares planted with Riesling. Germany - with 22.400 hectares - accounts for 2/3 of the total. The second largest Riesling producer is Australia, with 4500 hectares. But this is only about 1/10 of the total. Alsace follows with 3500 hectares. Austria, the US with Washington State and New York State as well as New Zealand make up the remainder. Overall, Riesling accounts for less than 1 percent of total wine production in the world, yet its unique versatile wine character prompts an ever growing number of followers.
The Mosel, Saar and Ruwer rivers twist and turn in narrow loops through countryside where the Celts and Romans first cultivated wine 2,000 years ago. As a wine region, the Mosel is the oldest in Germany and the largest with vines on steep slopes. Terraced hillsides and precipitous slopes, which face either south or south-west, create beneficial microclimates for wine grapes but also rare plants and animals. The sublime rieslings grown in these conditions in the Mosel , Saar and Ruwer vineyards rank among the finest white wines in the world with their wonderful mineral notes.
Probably the most unique characteristic of German wine is its use of a hierarchy measuring quality based on the grape's natural sugar level at harvest (which is entirely different from the sugar level of the finished wine). The same grape varietal can produce anything from bone dry to sweet dessert wines. The pinnacle of German wine making are bottles baring the designation "QmP" (Qualitatswein mit Pradikat / Pradikatswein), which is translated as "quality wine with distinction". The scale for QmP wines is based on six ascending degrees of ripeness. They start with Kabinett, then Spatlese, Auslese, and finally the dessert wines: Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein.
While today many great wines are found around the globe, it is the unique terroir and traditional production methods, which allow Germany to produce exceptional quality wines that are still some of the finest in the world.
Probably the most unique characteristic of German wine is its use of a hierarchy measuring quality based on the grape's natural sugar level at harvest (which is entirely different from the sugar level of the finished wine). The same grape varietal can produce anything from bone dry to sweet dessert wines. The pinnacle of German wine making are bottles baring the designation "QmP" (Qualitatswein mit Pradikat / Pradikatswein), which is translated as "quality wine with distinction". The scale for QmP wines is based on six ascending degrees of ripeness. They start with Kabinett, then Spatlese, Auslese, and finally the dessert wines: Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein.

Balthasar Ress

Founded in 1870 by the Rheingau hotelier Balthasar Ress, the wine estate numbers among the large, family-operated enterprises in the Rheingau today. A member of the selective VDP group, Balthasar Ress has consistent high standards of performance and reliability–hallmarks of the estate since its founding. In 1993, the new winery building “Rheinallee” purchased the old farm house offers in Rheinallee, which is an impressive setting for events of all kinds. Today the estate is run by Stefan and Christian Ress, who represent the fourth and fifth generations of the founding family. The vineyards cover 35 hectares of vineyards. They are planted on the vast majority of the Riesling (31.5 ha) and Pinot Noir and other varieties.

"Their Treasury Store (Wine Bank) vintage wines dating back until 1920th. Since June 2009, the winery also owns a 3,000 square meter vineyard on the island of Sylt, which is the most northerly vineyard in Germany."
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S.A. Prüm

S.A Prüm is a family-owned wine estate nestled on the banks of Germany’s serene Mosel River, at the heart of the country’s celebrated Mosel growing region. Here, the Prüm family has cultivated vines for over 200 years. The estate has been in the hands of Raimund Prüm, owner and winemaker, since 1971 when he assumed full management. Under his leadership, the property has become one of the region’s most successful wineries, boasting an international reputation for the production of exquisite Rieslings. .

S.A. Prüm is a founding member of the Association of German Premium Wineries (VDP), the consortium of Germany’s 200 top producers.
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Dr F. Weins Prüm

For centuries, wine-growing has been tradition in the Prüm family and Weins-Prüm produces some of the finest. The Weins Prüm estate is nestled on the steepest banks of Germany’s serene Mosel River, at the heart of the country’s celebrated Mosel growing region. In 1911, the owner Mathias-Prüm divided the land among his children. The youngest daughter Anna Maria married Dr. Francis wine. Their grandson is the present owner, Bert Selbach. Under his leadership, the property has become one of the region’s most successful wineries, boasting an international reputation for the production of exquisite Rieslings.

“I feel bound to our tradition, so that I do not follow every latest trend but without rejecting innovations. This is the philosophy I consistently try to implement in order to improve the high quality of my wines constantly.” – Bert Selbach
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Philipp Kuhn

Philipp Kuhn is focused on producing delicate wines with a powerful body and excellent durability. The Kuhn family has lived in Laumersheim since the 17th century. There and in the surrounding villages of Großkarlbach and Dirmstein lie its vineyards. Since 1992 Philipp Kuhn Junior, who was only 20 years old at the time, has been in charge of wine cultivation and production at the winery estate and now we get to taste the remarkable wines which resulted in Newcomer Winery of the Year in 2011 by Gault Millau Guide, Best Riesling 2016 by Feinschmecker and Vinum and avid fans all around the world.

“The 50:50 Kuhn rule: 50% red + 50% white = 100% dry styled” – Philipp Kuhn
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Willi Haag

The Haag estate has been in the same family for over 400 years. The original winery, a timber framed house built in the 15th century, still stands on the property near the modern winery. Their primary vineyard sites are located in the Brauneberger-Juffer and Juffer-Sonnenuhr with most of these vineyards being comprised of gray slate. The soil conditions and microclimate provide an excellent growing environment for Riesling due to the cool nights and warm days.

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